Whyte Ridge Youth Soccer

You maybe wondering why are we so passionate about soccer in Whyte Ridge. The following information should help you to understand.

 

10 Reasons Why Whyte Ridge Soccer is Great 

1. It is a recreational league, so no pressure.  Just fun. Lots of fun!

2. You play with your friends. Regardless of what school you attend, you will have a chance to play with neighbourhood friends – some that you may know and some that will be new friends.

3. It is in your neighbourhood. Home games and practices are held in Whyte Ridge

4. We have great coaches. Our very passionate volunteer coaches have won several tournaments in the city. We support and train them.

5. Game schedule is family friendly. Playing for a recreational league allows children to participate in other school and extra-curricular activities.  Games are not scheduled during summer holidays.

6. The program is affordable. Thanks to our sponsors we manage to keep the cost minimal and much lower than the developmental and premier leagues.

7. We have a strong team of soccer volunteers. And they’re always willing to help you to have a worry free experience.

8. No try outs. No cuts.

9. All players play the same amount of time.

10. Your parents can help as coaches, team managers, conveners etc. Everybody is welcome.

 

Frequently Asked Questions/A Beginner’s Guide to Youth Soccer in Whyte Ridge:

Why play soccer?

Soccer is a great way to get your kids active and outdoors – no screens involved! Regular exercise can help improve muscle strength, mood, and coordination. Soccer is a team sport – so it’s a great way to hang out with friends while making some new ones. Soccer is a life-sport – it can be played at any age or skill level.

 

WRYS, WSEU, WYSA; Recreational, Developmental – what does all this mean?

  • WRYS (Whyte Ridge Youth Soccer): Our local soccer club, which is run out of the Whyte Ridge Community Centre. This is who you will register with in order for your child to play soccer with a Whyte Ridge team. We play in a recreational league.  
  • WYSA (Winnipeg Youth Soccer Association): The governing association for Winnipeg. WYSA sets the guidelines, based on the Manitoba Soccer Association’s rules and regulations.  Winnipeg is divided into 5 different leagues by area. Whyte Ridge and surrounding area are in the WSEU league.
  • WSEU (Winnipeg South End United): Comprised of approximately 14 local community centres, one of which is Whyte Ridge Community Centre. WSEU organizes the playing schedule, tournaments, and hires referees etc. WSEU also hosts “developmental” teams which play in a different league than the recreational teams.
  • Recreational soccer focuses on enjoyment of the sport, teaching the rules and basics of soccer. As players advance through the recreational league, so will their skills. For the U9 to U12 age groups, scores and standings are not recorded, except in a tournament. Many of our recreational teams do go to various tournaments, and U13 and U14 have been to tournaments in Minnesota.
  • Developmental leagues require a greater commitment of time and money.  

 

How are teams determined?

Children are divided into girls and boys teams and are determined by birth year.  U9G and U9B (meaning Under 9 year old Girl or Boy) are usually in grade 3. U10G and U10B are usually 4th graders.  Teams are typically 12 – 14 players and are set on a first-come, first-served basis. Late registrants risk not being able to join a Whyte Ridge team due to team sizes. Small numbered age groups are also at risk of being transferred to another local community centre’s team, so encourage your child’s friends to enroll.  You should know what team your child is on some time in April.

Children from Linden Ridge and Whyte Ridge register with Whyte Ridge Community Centre (www.whyteridge.ca) while children from Bridgewater Lakes register with South Winnipeg Community Centres (http://www.swcc1.ca).

 

I’ve noticed a price increase from Mini-Soccer to Youth Soccer, why?

Fees for youth soccer go to: registration with WSEU, field fees, referees, equipment (including field equipment like nets), and uniforms.

 

How long is the season? How many games per week? Where are games played?

Outdoor soccer runs for about 2 months, starting once the snow has melted and the fields are in good playing condition, usually beginning late April or the first week of May. Typically, there is a tournament in September. Usually, there are 2 games per week. For the U9 and U10 age groups, usually a short practice is held before each game. Your coach may set additional practices if desired.  Games are held within our local south-western corner of Winnipeg – addresses of field locations are available on the WSEU site when the schedule becomes available.

 

What sort of equipment does my child need?

As part of your registration fee, your child will receive a jersey, pair of shorts, and a pair of socks – for him/her to keep! You will need to provide shin pads and outdoor soccer shoes with cleats. Baseball shoes are unacceptable, as they have a spike at the toe. You will also want to send your child to soccer games with a water bottle at all times and perhaps a snack to eat afterwards.

 

What roles are parents able to fill?

Convener – A convener is part of the WRYS team that helps organize the sport in our community. Currently, we have 2 conveners for the U9-U18 age groups, with 2 open positions. If you have younger children, positions are also available for Mini-soccer.  Email whyteridgesoccer@gmail.com if you are interested in any convening positions.

Coach – Every team needs a coach; players can’t play without one! A volunteer parent fills this position, one for every team. Moms can coach too! There are some requirements that must be met to coach youth soccer, and you can see these on our website. Coaching is an unpaid position, but the rewards of working with your child and his or her friends on the team bring a lot of fulfillment and satisfaction to coaches. If you’ve never played or coached soccer before, that’s okay! There are clinics available, and a number of seasoned coaches that can mentor you. Also, there are numerous online resources to help you find age-appropriate drills for your team. Check out You-Tube for videos!  Only accredited team officials are permitted on the sidelines during a game.

Assistant Coach – This is filled by a second volunteer parent, and this person also needs to fill out the appropriate paperwork as a coach, and meet the requirements. He/She supports the coach and may step in if the coach is unavailable.  Coaches are responsible for team equipment including: balls, game balls, corner flags, pinnies and first-aid kit.  All this equipment will be handed out at the start of the season.

Manager – no paperwork required here, just someone to help manage the team. TeamSnap is a great program for this. You can also set up a snack-schedule if your parents are interested in sharing this responsibility.

Bench Parent – A team may need a same-gender parent on the sidelines during a game. For example, if both the coach and assistant coach are females on a boys’ team, a male parent must sit with the team. No coaching requirements needed, but you may be asked to step in if there is an injury or if a player needs to be escorted from the field.

Flag person – A parent is needed on each side of the field (typically, each team will provide one flag person) to watch if the ball crosses the sideline. If it does, you raise the flag to alert the referee.

Supporter – Every team needs a cheering section! You will sit with other supporters on the opposite side of the field as the team. Please be respectful of both teams playing, the referee and the coaches. Remember that coaches are volunteers – if you think that you can do a better job, please volunteer! Referees are often young adults who are just learning. Sometimes they will make a call in your team’s favour, sometimes not. Teaching our kids to respect the calls made is part of the game.